The Insecure Writer’s Support Group #IWSG

The Insecure Writer's Support Group

If you’d like to chime in and let us know your answers to the questions or drop a link to your post if you’re participating, please do so in the comments! And check out the IWSG website for more answers!

October 5th – What do you consider the best characteristics of your favorite genre?

Jayden: My favorite genre is romance. I love that there’s always a Happily Ever After. Real life is often serious and sad, so when I invest time in reading, I like that it can have a nice, neat conclusion. What’s your favorite romance novel or who is your favorite romance author?

Richard: Not a genre per se, but I’m going to go with serial fiction in all its forms. I like the way the spread out pacing gives a story room to breathe and for people to speculate and interact in “real time” with it as it develops.

What do you love about your favorite genre?

The Insecure Writer’s Support Group #IWSG

The Insecure Writer's Support Group

If you’d like to chime in and let us know your answers to the questions or drop a link to your post if you’re participating, please do so in the comments! And check out the IWSG website for more answers!

September 7th – What genre would be the worst one for you to tackle and why?

Jayden: Historical fiction. I don’t have a great grasp on history, so I’d have to do *a lot* of research, which I don’t particularly care for. I love to read it, but writing it would be awful.

Richard: Does Fanfic count? I’ve tried it a couple times, and I just can’t wrap my head around writing other people’s characters.

What would be your hardest genre to tackle?

The Insecure Writer’s Support Group #IWSG

The Insecure Writer's Support Group

If you’d like to chime in and let us know your answers to the questions or drop a link to your post if you’re participating, please do so in the comments! And check out the IWSG website for more answers!

August 3rd question – When you set out to write a story, do you try to be more original or do you try to give readers what they want?

Jayden: I write for myself. I tried writing to get published, but especially in the world of kinky smut, they often want very specific things. As a bisexual switch, sometimes I want a variety of things in one story. It depends on my mood. So when I write and self-publish, I can write whatever combinations I want. It’s very freeing. I just keep reminding myself of the best writing advice I’ve ever been given: write what you want to read.

Richard: For most genre writing, I think you should be trying to do both. If you’re writing a fantasy story, people want to see some dragon slaying or whatever. But you should be trying to do your dragon slaying in an original way. Have your peasants give the dragon more and more tributes until it’s suffocated/crushed under it’s horde!

Original or Give ’em What They Want?

The Insecure Writer’s Support Group #IWSG

The Insecure Writer's Support Group

If you’d like to chime in and let us know your answers to the questions or drop a link to your post if you’re participating, please do so in the comments! And check out the IWSG website for more answers!

July 6 question – If you could live in any book world, which one would you choose?

Jayden: That’s hard because a lot of the books I read are dystopian, and that doesn’t sound so great! Harry Potter is a very cool world to live in, once You Know Who is gone, anyway. I guess I’ll stick with that one.
Richard: One of those safety instruction books, where people drop blenders into tubs and stuff. It just seems like a very strange place, I’d like to find out more about it.

What book world would you want to live in?

The Insecure Writer’s Support Group #IWSG

The Insecure Writer's Support Group

If you’d like to chime in and let us know your answers to the questions or drop a link to your post if you’re participating, please do so in the comments! And check out the IWSG website for more answers!

June 1 question – When the going gets tough writing the story, how do you keep yourself writing to the end? If you have not started writing yet, why do you think that is and what do you think could help you find your groove and start?

Jayden: I know that if I don’t finish a project in one go, I won’t ever finish it. It’s too hard for me to come back to it after a lot of time away. That’s why NaNo is so great for me–I can write the whole novel in one shot. (Not one day, generally, but one month at least.) When I switch between projects, I tend to get distracted and lose track of details, even when I outline what I’m writing as I write it. So that motivation of knowing I might not ever finish the project is a big part of getting to the end.

On the other hand, I’ve been kicking around this erotic novel set in a world with societies of Dommes (and dinosaurs!) but I haven’t, and Richard and I even did the whole worldbuilding outline! I don’t know what’s stopping me there, but I am hopeful that I can get to in July for CampNaNo. Having other people to support me definitely helps a lot!

Richard: My favorite trick is to switch how I’m telling the story. A lot of my writing has mini-epistolary sections, so those are a great opportunity to think about it from a different angle and get unstuck. Swapping to a different part or character can work too, but I find the little snippets I get from writing travel guides, new casts, etc. are more useful.

How do you motivate yourself?

The Insecure Writer’s Support Group #IWSG

The Insecure Writer's Support Group

If you’d like to chime in and let us know your answers to the questions or drop a link to your post if you’re participating, please do so in the comments! And check out the IWSG website for more answers!

May 4 question – It’s the best of times; it’s the worst of times. What are your writer highs (the good times)? And what are your writer lows (the crappy times)?

Jayden: Oh, well, let’s see. The best times were writing times with friends. I can’t count the number of evenings I spent laughing, writing, laughing some more. My best friends and I co-wrote a story. We all sat with our laptops taking turns writing paragraphs. It was entertaining. Slow going, but entertaining. Then we would get distracted talking, but it was an amazing experience, and I hope that we’ll be able to get back to it.

The worst times were the deadlines. Self-imposed deadlines, for me, but still. Staying up late, getting up early, squeezing in words in every available moment. The times that I had to type with my eyes closed because I literally couldn’t keep them open anymore. But all worth it for the novels and short stories I’ve written, and the love I have with my writing friends. And of course, the fact that through my writing group, I met my partner. We blog together, we live together, and now we’re married. I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Richard: The best part of writing is when you finish a project. The worst part is any time anyone reads anything I write.

What are your writers highs and lows?

The Insecure Writer’s Support Group #IWSG

The Insecure Writer's Support Group

It’s our one year anniversary with IWSG! I’m impressed with us that we haven’t missed a month, though we’ve squeaked in a little late here and there.

If you’d like to chime in and let us know your answers to the questions or drop a link to your post if you’re participating, please do so in the comments! And check out the IWSG website for more answers!

April 6 question – Have any of your books been made into audio books? If so, what is the main challenge in producing an audiobook?

Jayden: I can answer for both of us. Nope! For me, I don’t even know where I would begin to produce an audiobook. Although, fun fact, I once recorded about 90% of a novel as an audiobook for a boyfriend in high school. It was his favorite book and there was no audiobook of it. When I couldn’t buy one, I wanted to record it just for him, but I never finished and then we broke up. Ah well. Would’ve been a copyright issue, anyway

Richard also said no, but he did make a writing observation today that we’ll share: He’s enjoying our A to Z Challenge blog posts. I (Jayden) am writing the worldbuilding details, and he’s writing a story to go with it, except he’s purposefully not quite writing about the same thing I am. For example, coming up on 4/7 is “F is for Food” but he somehow wrote more about firepower and scarecrows than food! It’s worth the read though!

Have you ever had a novel made into an audiobook?

The Insecure Writer’s Support Group #IWSG

The Insecure Writer's Support Group

Happy one year anniversary to our participation in IWSG!

If you’d like to chime in and let us know your answers to the questions or drop a link to your post if you’re participating, please do so in the comments! And check out the IWSG website for more answers!

March 2 question – Have you ever been conflicted about writing a story or adding a scene to a story? How did you decide to write it or not?

Jayden: Absolutely. I write a lot of smut (pretty much exclusively smut) and over the years, my kinks have gotten less mainstream. It’s sexy as hell to me to write smut about golden showers, ass to mouth, etc. but sometimes I question if I should publish those scenes. I write for myself, but I like to share. So in the end, I write what I like and hope that others like it (or will skip over the ones they don’t like).

Richard: I think all writers are conflicted about something at some point or another. For me, the answer is almost always, “right it now, edit it later.” Usually I can tell part way through the scene if it’ll be a keeper or not.

Have you been conflicted?

The Insecure Writer’s Support Group #IWSG

The Insecure Writer's Support Group

We’re back for an 11th month of The Insecure Writer’s Support Group! Almost a full year!

If you’d like to chime in and let us know your answers to the questions or drop a link to your post if you’re participating, please do so in the comments! And check out the IWSG website for more answers!

February 2 question – Is there someone who supported or influenced you that perhaps isn’t around anymore? Anyone you miss?

Jayden: Of course there are. My grandparents are a prime example. I miss them terribly. Although they didn’t always understand me, they always supported me. I hope they’d be proud of me if they could see me now.

Richard: I’m also going to say my grandparents. I wish I’d learned more of my Gramma’s recipes, and I think my grandfathers would’ve had all kinds of cool stuff to teach me. We have a lot of hobbies in common, and they supported me while they were alive.

Is there someone you miss who influenced you?